Paper Reviews
How can we show that deep learning and the brain are related? Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience Final Post

How can we show that deep learning and the brain are related? Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience Final Post

As we’ve discussed in our previous posts, this paper on the integration of deep learning and neuroscience has been highly speculative. The authors have listed deep learning-inspired hypotheses about the brain and discussed how the brain may be consistent with those hypotheses. The concluding portion of the paper discusses potential experiments that could help prove...
Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 3

Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 3

In our previous post we talked about how the brain might optimize cost functions. Now we’ll explore how cost functions may be generated, represented, and change over time in the brain. Marblestone et al outline several ways that cost functions could be generated.  In particular, they talk about specialized circuitry for comparing the predicted output...
Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 2

Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 2

One of the key sticking points in discussions comparing machine learning and the brain is how the notion of “learning” differs between computational and biological systems. In section 2 of their paper, Marblestone et al. grapple with this issue in detail. For our introduction post on this paper, go here. Deep neural networks are trained...
Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 1

Paper Review: An Integration of Deep Learning and Neuroscience, Part 1

Nicole: More and more I see that people are very concerned with the biological plausibility of neural networks. I think this comes from the fact that we as machine learners are finally achieving human-level performance on some tasks. It has renewed faith in the idea that the best way to “solve” intelligence is to copy...
Paper review: The brain adapts to dishonesty

Paper review: The brain adapts to dishonesty

Does dishonesty escalate over time? Garrett et al seek to answer this question and substantiate something we all have observed anecdotally: that dishonesty can be a “slippery slope.” The idea is that if you are dishonest once, it is easier to be dishonest again, and this effect can accumulate over time. This paper generated some...
ML Ethics and the "Criminal Detector"

ML Ethics and the “Criminal Detector”

Confession: I roll my eyes whenever someone says the word ‘singularity.’ As awesome frightening as it would be to have computers take over the world, the fear of that potential future distracts from the more pressing ethical concerns surrounding machine learning and AI today. Edward Snowden alerted everyone in the US to the possibility that...
Paper Review: Fixing the stimulus­ as fixed ­effect fallacy in task fMRI

Paper Review: Fixing the stimulus­ as fixed ­effect fallacy in task fMRI

Fixing the stimulus­-as-­fixed-­effect fallacy in task fMRI Jacob Westfall, Thomas E. Nichols, and  Tal Yarkoni http://biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2016/09/25/077131.full.pdf In traditional fMRI experiments it’s typical to show subjects a limited set of stimuli (e.g. “tasty tomato”), but generalize the results to larger classes from which the stimuli were drawn (e.g. adjectives and nouns). According to Westfall, Nichols and...
Quick hit: Can we open the black box of AI?

Quick hit: Can we open the black box of AI?

Image by Simon Predes, taken from article Quick hit: Can we open the black box of AI? Davide Castelvecchi http://www.nature.com/news/can-we-open-the-black-box-of-ai-1.20731 An excerpt from a recent discussion of  “black box” deep-network-driven AI methods in Nature: Scientists should embrace deep learning without being “too anal” about the black box. After all, they all carry a black box...
Could a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor?

Could a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor?

Paper Review: Could a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor? Eric Jonas and Konrad Kording http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/05/26/055624 Do neuroscientific techniques really tell us how the brain works? Are neuroscientists just barking up the wrong tree? Jonas and Kording think we might be. However, Alona and Nicole disagree. Alona: Nicole, you found this paper a few weeks ago and we...